Newark lead levels are lower but still elevated, new water tests show

Posted Jan 06, 2020

Lead levels in Newark’s drinking water remain elevated but dropped slightly in the last six months, the latest sampling shows.

The results come amid the city’s aggressive $134 million program to remove every lead pipe providing water to homes and businesses.

Lead has plagued Newark’s water since 2017. City officials previously said they expected high lead levels to continue until a new water treatment takes full effect or lead pipes are replaced.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Will Booker Hit a 2020 Wall? DNC talks Diversity but Lives and Dies by Campaign Cash and Polls

By Bob Hennelly | January 5, 2020

Insider NJ

 

For most of the career of Sen. Cory Booker, he’s been at the center of establishment politics, but now, thanks to the DNC’s high bar for participation in the Jan. 14 debate, he finds himself on the outside looking in.

With the DNC’s reliance on polling and campaign cash metrics for qualifying, he faces the prospect that for the second time in a row he won’t make the televised debate stage, less than a month before the first Democratic voters vote in for the Feb 3 Iowa Caucus.

Not since his days of running as an insurgent, confronting the powerful incumbent Newark Mayor Sharpe James, has Booker faced such long odds.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

N.J. university will pay millions for role in defrauding government program for veterans

Updated Jan 03, 2020

Caldwell University in Essex County has agreed to pay the United States more than $4.8 million to resolve its role in a scheme to defraud a federal education benefit program for veterans, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito announced Friday.

"Caldwell University tried to hoodwink the Department of Veterans Affairs and, worse, veterans themselves, by claiming to offer online classes developed and provided by Caldwell that were in fact marked-up offerings by an online correspondence school,” Carpenito said in a statement. "Our veterans should never be treated this way, and we will continue to work to ensure that they receive all of the benefits that they deserve as a result of their service to the country.”

Under a deal marketed by Ed4Mil, a Pennsylvania-based company, veterans could use their Post-9/11 GI Bill tuition benefits to enroll in online courses offered by Caldwell, authorities said. The bill was designed specifically to help veterans who served in the armed forces following the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Essex County approves civilian panel to review jail housing ICE detainees

Updated Dec 19, 2019

Essex County has announced the creation of a nine-member civilian panel to review the county’s jail, which houses ICE detainees, though critics say the move is an attempt to silence the calls for the county to end its ICE contract.

County officials said the Correctional Facility Civilian Task Force — comprised of formerly incarcerated people, advocates, various experts and a member of the public — will hold the Essex County Correctional Facility accountable in light of recent events, including a lawsuit filed by an ex-ICE detainee who said guards allowed another inmate to attack him.

County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo Jr. said the task force, approved Dec. 12, will ensure “conditions of their confinement are safe, sanitary, respectful and humane," according to the ordinance for the board’s creation.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Sharing Services Has Saved Money for NJ Local Governments: Wall Street Analysis

RON MARSICO | DECEMBER 20, 2019

NJ Spotlight

“The main takeaway is this is an opportunity for cost savings,’’ said a Moody’s analyst.

---

It’s a simple formula: Sharing equals savings in the Garden State, according to Moody’s Investors Services.

Pooling services has reduced costs for New Jersey’s municipalities and counties, while maintaining service levels and preserving resources, Moody’s determined in a research report issued this week.

Moody’s specifically found: “New Jersey local governments will continue to curb expense growth and save money via shared services agreements in an environment of rising costs and declining appetite for raising taxes.’’

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Trump Impeached for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress

By Nicholas Fandos and 

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Updated Dec. 19, 2019

Speaker Nancy Pelosi arriving at her office on Wednesday before the House voted on articles of impeachment against President Trump.

---

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives on Wednesday impeached President Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, making him the third president in history to be charged with committing high crimes and misdemeanors and face removal by the Senate.

On a day of constitutional consequence and raging partisan tension, the votes on the two articles of impeachment fell largely along party lines, after a bitter debate that stretched into the evening and reflected the deep polarization gripping American politics in the Trump era.

Only two Democrats opposed the article on abuse of power, which accused Mr. Trump of corruptly using the levers of government to solicit election assistance from Ukraine in the form of investigations to discredit his Democratic political rivals. Republicans were united in opposition. It passed 230 to 197, with Speaker Nancy Pelosi gaveling the vote to a close from the House rostrum.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Was Newark’s water crisis preventable? Records reveal problems festered for years.

Updated Dec 18, 2019

Before the comparisons to Flint, Michigan, before trucks full of bottled water rumbled through Newark’s streets, before parents rushed to test their kids for lead poisoning, somebody knew there was a problem.

A state regulator, alarmed by Newark’s water disinfection practices, warned city officials that residents should boil their water, according to never-before-released letters from 2014 obtained by NJ Advance Media.

“If the monthly operator reports are correct then the water provided ... potentially compromised public health,” the state official wrote, citing five months of water testing.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

NYC countersues Newark over controversial homeless relocation program

Updated Dec 17, 2019

New York City is countersuing Newark in an ongoing legal battle over a controversial homeless program, claiming that a new local rule banning the relocation of low-income families to the New Jersey city is unconstitutional and accusing Newark of trying to “wall off” itself from that demographic.

At issue is NYC’s placement of homeless families in apartments across the country with a year’s worth of rent paid up front. About 1,200 families have been relocated to Newark since 2017 to residences that had been undisclosed to the city. But Newark officials say those families are often left in uninhabitable conditions without any leverage to force repairs.

Newark took NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio to federal court earlier this month to temporarily halt future relocations until both sides could work out a compromise. The lawsuit came after Newark outlawed the NYC program through an ordinance prohibiting landlords from accepting more than a month’s worth of rent from a subsidy or voucher program and prohibiting any party from bringing a needy person to the city for government assistance.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Strict Vaccine Law Stumbles in N.J. Legislature

By Sharon Otterman and 

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Dec. 16, 2019

Gov. Philip D. Murphy of New Jersey in September.

---

The New Jersey Legislature, seemingly on the verge of passing one of the strictest vaccine laws in the nation on Monday, postponed a final vote on a bill that would have ended religious exemptions to vaccine requirements for students enrolled in any school or college, public or private.

The decision came amid raucous protests, with dozens of parents and children who oppose mandatory vaccines standing just outside the door to the State Senate stomping and chanting, “Do not touch my child!” Hundreds of other protesters shouted from outside the building.

After the State Assembly passed its version of the bill — 45 to 25, with six abstentions — on Monday afternoon, the bill moved to the Senate, where the vote had been expected to pass by a small margin. But as the evening wore on, lawmakers realized they did not have enough votes.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Bill paving way for bigger school property tax hikes heads to governor

Updated Dec 16, 2019

The state Legislature on Monday passed a bill that would allow some school districts in New Jersey to charge higher property taxes than state law allows.

The measure would apply to school districts that have lost aid as the state shakes up its funding formula, allowing these districts to make up their losses by exceeding the 2-percent cap on tax increases.

Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat, has already come out against the measure, which was introduced just three weeks ago by state Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

← Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9    194  195  Next →