Debunking Chris Christie’s Claims About Common Core State Standards

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N.J. schools would teach kids how to interact with police under proposed law

By Matt Friedman | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
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on February 10, 2015

TRENTON — New Jersey schools would be required to teach students how they should interact with police officers under proposed legislation a sponsor says could protect both kids and cops.

The bill, (A4130), introduced last week, would require school districts to come up with instructions for students as part of their Social Studies Core Curriculum Content Standards that would include "the role and responsibilities of a law enforcement official in providing for public safety" and "an individual's responsibilities to comply with a directive from a law enforcement official."

One of the sponsors, state Assemblyman Ralph Caputo (D-Essex), said the bill was inspired partly by recent incidents of police shootings around the country, including the death of Michael Brown in Ferugson, Mo.

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Chris Christie’s About-Face on Common Core Standards Turns Debate Upside-Down

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Payne Papers: 13,000 documents from N.J.'s first African American Congressman find home at Seton Hall

By Jessica Mazzola | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
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on February 09, 2015

Congressman Donald Payne speaks during the announcement of a $7 million federal grant for New Jersey fire departments at the Newark Fire Training Academy. April 27, 2011.

 

SOUTH ORANGE — More than 13,000 documents chronicling the political career of New Jersey's first African American Congressman have found a new home.

Seton Hall University announced late last week that its library system has acquired the Donald M. Payne Papers, a historical manuscript from the late Congressman, who represented the state's 10th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1989 until his death in 2012. The collection is made up of more than 13,000 items, including legislative documentation, research files, news clippings, photographs, and AV recordings, the school said in an announcement about the acquisition.

"My father lived a fascinating and fruitful life, dedicated to human rights and conflict resolution. Anyone reviewing the collection will find insight and inspiration, not only through my father's work as a Congressman, but his life-long passion and dedication to making the world a better place," Payne's son, Donald Jr., who currently holds the Congressional seat his father once did, said in a statement about the acquisition.

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Booker not ready for VP, according to Monmouth Poll findings

By Max Pizarro | 02/09/15

PolitickerNJ

 

Senator Booker? Yes. Vice-President Booker? Not so fast, according to those polled by Monmouth University.

President Barack Obama has reversed his downward slide in Garden State public opinion and both of New Jersey’s U.S. Senators enjoy positive job approval ratings, but while a majority give junior Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) thumbs up on his performance so far, they feel he may be a bit too junior to start eyeing his party’s vice presidential slot.

Senior senator Bob Menendez (D-NJ) garners a 48% approve to 26% disapprove rating among all New Jersey residents and a 49% approve to 27% disapprove rating among registered voters.  This marks a slight improvement over his September 2014 voter rating of 45% approve to 30% disapprove.

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What exactly is it about New Jersey that makes its public officials so seemingly… corruptible?

By Chase Brush | 02/08/15

PolitickerNJ

Another day, another potentially career-devastating scandal emerges in connection with an enterprising public official in New Jersey, where the moniker “Soprano State” continues to take on new meaning

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Former U.S. Senator Robert Torricelli looked like he was on the fast-track to higher callings when a federal investigation slammed the brakes on his career. Mired in an ethically-nefarious controversy involving suspicious bribes and a grandfather clock, Torricelli’s reputation was all but completely tarnished when a federal investigation found he had accepted illegal campaign contributions from multiple donors. He was never actually convicted of any wrongdoing, but the incident forced him from public service under a cloud.

Torricelli is an apt example of how a promising public official could find his or her career quickly sunk in the quagmires of New Jersey’s political landscape, if they’re not too careful. In a state where real estate values are among the highest in the nation, sweetheart deals with private contractors can pay off big, and double-dipping is business as usual, temptation to do wrong abounds, creating an atmosphere where politicians and party bosses sometimes look like they’re competing with one another for the role of Vito Corleone in the Godfather. It’s this seemingly pervasive culture of corruption and crookedness that’s earned New Jersey the nickname the “Soprano State”, and one doesn’t have to go far to find other examples to reinforce the argument.

New Jersey’s political history is chock full of officials — elected or otherwise — who’ve been caught up in situations that nearly or totally destroyed their careers.

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In Christie’s Career, a Fondness for Luxe Benefits When Others Pay the Bills

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Opinion: Black History Month is essential

By Jersey Journal Guest Columnist
on February 02, 2015

Sylvia DuBois was born into slavery in the Sourlands and is shown with her daughter standing behind her in this late-19th century photo. Courtesy of the East Amwell Historic Society

 

Rutgers Today talked to Khadijah White about why Black History Month is important as the university plans a series of events in observance. White, an assistant professor of journalism and media studies in the School of Communication and Information, researches race, gender and politics in media.

Why is Black History Month relevant?

There has long been a contention among student and teacher activists that educators in this country, who are predominantly white, would not teach about black history at all if it weren't for people explicitly setting aside space and time for it. Now, at least for this month, students can learn about how African-Americans quite literally built this society and provided its foundation in so many ways.

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Fulop and Baraka: Odd Couple, or power couple?

By Mark Bonamo | 01/30/15

PolitickerNJ

 

One man, 37, Jewish-American, is the grandson of Holocaust survivors who took a commonplace road from the suburbs to Wall Street. Then, he decisively swerved on to a different track to the U.S. Marines, war in Iraq, and ultimately the home front of Hudson County politics.

Another man, 44, African-American, is the son of one of the most prominent poets of urban America who was molded by the civic blast furnace of Newark’s 1967 riot, or rebellion, pick your own term. Learning his lessons well, the son became a poet in his own right, a teacher, a principal and ultimately a politician.

The roads of the first man, Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop, and the second, Newark Mayor Ras Baraka, converged during last year’s Newark mayoral race. Fulop, knowing that the eyes of New Jersey and even national politicos were on him, rolled the dice hard and backed Baraka.

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Measure Aims to Speed Up Food Stamp Applications, Ease Burden on Recipients

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