New Jersey's Incredible Shrinking $225 Million Exxon Mobil Settlement

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Outside the Box Thinking Propels Orange Township’s Continued Crime Decrease

 Director_Sims.jpeg

Orange Township In Essex County, New Jersey, holds a unique position among the other municipalities in one of the state’s most diverse and populous counties.  Smack in he middle of suburban opulence, bourgeois coteries and urban grittiness,  the township not only possesses the characteristics of many of its neighbors. Orange is an amalgamation of all of the above.

Unfettered access to I-280, quick accessibility to the Garden State Parkway, the Turnpike and half a dozen other highways, makes Orange a bustling throughway as well as a dynamic port of call for tens of thousands of people every day.

With 30,000 residents squeezed into 2.2 square miles, geography isn’t the only thing that gives Orange its inimitable character.  The township’s distinctive city/suburban profile also presents some unique policing challenges.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

New coalition calls for 'economic justice' in N.J. prisons

By Naomi Nix | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on April 04, 2015

The Interfaith Prison Coalition of New Jersey held its first organizational meeting on Saturday to discuss issues about economic justice in state prisons.

 

NEWARK — A new coalition of activists and former prisoners on Saturday called for greater "economic justice" in New Jersey's prisons.

Speaking before an audience of about 50 at Elmwood Presbyterian Church, People's Organization for Progress chair Larry Hamm said the current prison system perpetuates inequality in America.

"Jim crow is too kind a term to describe the hell that exists (in prison)," he said. "What we are talking about is a system of modern day slavery."

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Sharpe James, Bernie Kerik attack 'dehumanizing' criminal justice system

By Terrence T. McDonald | The Jersey Journal
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on April 02, 2015

Former New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik, left, and Former Newark Mayor Sharpe James are two of the speakers during the 2nd Annual Prisoner Reentry Conference at St. Peter's University in Jersey City on Thursday, April 2, 2015.

 

JERSEY CITY -- Former Newark Mayor Sharpe James and Bernard Kerik, a former New York police commissioner, appeared at the city's prisoner re-entry conference at Saint Peter's University this afternoon to speak out about the horrors they experienced while incarcerated in federal prison.

The two men called on officials to reform the criminal justice system, saying there are too many people being sent to prison, which they said is as violent as life on the streets and where inmates learn nothing but how to lie, cheat and steal.

"Prison is like your pet dog on a leash," said James, 79, who spent two years behind bars after being convicted of fraud charges in 2008. "If he does the right thing, you reward him with a can of Alpo. (He) does the wrong thing, you kick him, yank, take a stick ... or put him in a cage. That's what prison life is all about."

Read more
3 reactions Share

Christie 'bullied' teacher during heated town hall exchange, NJEA says

By Matt Arco | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on April 02, 2015

TRENTON — The state's largest public employee union is coming to the defense of a New Jersey teacher who sparked a heated exchanged with Gov. Chris Christie during his latest town hall on Tuesday.

Steve Wollmer, of the New Jersey Education Association, accused Christie of having bullied Kathy Mooney, a high school English teacher in Roselle Park, after she attempted to ask the governor a question.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Senator Robert Menendez Indicted on Corruption Charges

Read more
Add your reaction Share

New Jersey Lottery Falls Short Of Targets After Chris Christie Privatizes Management

Posted: 03/31/2015 6:57

HUFFINGTON POST

 

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- When Chris Christie privatized the management of New Jersey's lottery two years ago, he said its new overseers would "modernize and maximize" the games.

Instead, a lottery once ranked among the nation's top performers is now lagging for the second straight year, trailing its state income targets by $64 million seven months into the current fiscal year. Meanwhile, the company running it has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to hire lobbyists and a public relations firm with close ties to the governor.

New Jersey lawmakers anticipated receiving nearly $1.04 billion in income from the lottery this year, a number reduced to just $955 million in a revised budget released this month. Having collected an estimated $510 million seven months into this fiscal year, the lottery is not on track to meet even its lowered expectations.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Making full pension payment would have 'incredible' impact on N.J. residents, treasurer says

By Samantha Marcus | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on March 30, 2015

Treasurer Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff speaks to the Assembly Budget Committee.

 

TRENTON — Gov. Chris Christie's treasurer said Monday that the administration has reached out to lawmakers to comply with a judge's orders to work together to restore a $1.6 billion to this year's pension payment, but stressed that actually doing that would mean lots of budget pain for New Jersey residents.

A state Superior Court judge ruled last month that the administration and legislators must work together to come up with the cash, which Christie slashed last year to balance the budget.

Christie plans to appeal the ruling, and Treasurer Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff said they're "quite confident" in their legal position that the state can't be forced to make the payment. Labor unions, meanwhile, have argued the governor broke a contract requiring him to ramp up payments into the public worker pension system.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

N.J. slashes prescription costs for retired public workers

By Samantha Marcus | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on March 25, 2015

TRENTON — Gov. Chris Christie's administration has agreed to drastically roll back prescription copays for thousands of retired public employees after illegally raising them in 2013, NJ Advance Media has learned.

The deal follows a ruling from a state appeals court in December that New Jersey's pension division overstepped its authority when it hiked the drug rates following celebrated pension reforms Christie enacted in 2011.

Two public employee union leaders said the state and the unions have reached a deal to return to 2012 rates. In addition, the state will cut rates more severely, anywhere from 80 to 100 percent, in the last six months of this year to compensate retirees who have been overpaying for more than two years.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Christie denies he swiped at Walker in Florida — then swipes at Dem leadership over Exxon

By Chase Brush | 03/23/15

PolitickerNJ

 

Gov. Chris Christie tonight denied that a series of comments he gave in Florida this weekend about politicians “flip-flopping” on issues were directed towards a potential Republican presidential opponent, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

Christie, back on 101.5’s weekly “Ask the Governor” radio show, said he was not aiming to take a swipe at Walker when he told a crowd of about 250 donors during a Republican National Committee retreat on Saturday that they should beware of candidates prone to “pandering” or “flip-flopping”.

A Times article that first reported the comments noted that Walker, who’s emerged something of a frontrunner for the 2016 nomination over the last few weeks, stood nearby as Christie gave his speech.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

← Previous  1  2    165  166  167  168  169  170  171  172  173    221  222  Next →