Pivotal Questions Await Answers as School Bells Ring in New Jersey

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Christie Studies Foreign Affairs for a 2016 Test

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Christie says Baraka should run the city not the schools

By Max Pizarro | August 28th, 2014

SEA BRIGHT - Back in New Jersey after an RGA swing through Arkansas yesterday, Gov. Chris Christie slapped at Newark Mayor Ras Baraka.

"The mayor should run the city and not run the schools," said Christie, who cited the city's budget deficit. "The mayor has plenty on his plate to worry about."

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Chris Christie should take a lesson from Ras Baraka's playbook: Editorial

By Star-Ledger Editorial Board
on August 25, 2014

Newark Mayor Ras Baraka held his first of five town hall meetings last week, to discuss the city budget and education. And oh what a contrast it was from the type of town halls we've come to expect in New Jersey, thanks to Gov. Chris Christie and his army of political handlers.

Christie, who's held well over 100 town halls across this state, made himself into a national political star with made-for-YouTube moments at these events. They are usually held against backdrops of high school gyms and community centers. But they are not about real feedback from the public.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

$260M in federal post-Sandy aid awarded to N.J.'s largest wastewater treatment plant

By Erin O'Neill | The Star-Ledger
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on August 24, 2014

Joe Perno, a maintenance foreman, works to repair one of the damaged air compressors at the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission treatment plant. The plant remains only partially operable more than two weeks after being flooded by Hurricane Sandy, spewing hundreds of million of gallons of only partially treated sewage per day into local waterways.

 

The federal government has awarded New Jersey's largest wastewater-treatment plant more than $260 million in post-Hurricane Sandy aid to fortify the facility against future storm damage.

The Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission’s 152-acre plant in Newark was crippled during Sandy as a 12-foot storm surge pushed across the property, flooding critical infrastructure. Power outages left key pumping stations inoperable for 48 hours, forcing the plant to dump 840 million gallons of untreated sewage into Newark Bay to prevent raw sewage from backing up into thousands of homes, officials said.

Gov. Chris Christie and federal lawmakers announced the roughly $260 million grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency last week. The grant, they said, was the largest ever awarded through the federal agency's public assistance program.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Rice calls on Education Commissioner, Attorney General to launch Newark public schools investigation

By Chase Brush | August 19th, 2014

 

NEWARK - As the school year starts anew under a controversial reorganization plan that has had community members and lawmakers at odds, state Sen. Ronald Rice (D-28) is again calling on top state education and law enforcement officials to investigate administrative and fiscal mishandlings within Newark’s public school system.

In a letter today, Rice, co-chair of the Joint Committee on the Public Schools, called on acting state Education Commissioner David Hespe, acting Attorney General John Hoffman, and acting state Comptroller Marc Larkins to look into a laundry list of issues that have plagued the district in recent months, from questions about how to deal with the district’s projected $53 million budget deficit to potential abuses of power at the hands of embattled schools superintendent Cami Anderson.

“Newark students are preparing to begin another school year and, unfortunately, the questionable handling of numerous matters concerning the district has yet to be addressed,” Rice said. “I am reissuing my request for an investigation into the administrative and financial decisions that have been made within the district. These are issues concerning conflicts of interest and potentially more serious matters that cannot be ignored. Since the state-appointed superintendent is not answerable to the school board or to the public, it is up to the state to examine the district’s affairs.”

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Essex Royale: Jones pulls party faithful in for night of gaming, political mixing

By Max Pizarro | August 18th, 2014

 

BELLEVILLE – Elbows on the felt table top, veteran Democratic Party political operative Phil Alagia looked across the void in a room crammed with party members getting a groove on as a bow-tied dealer dealt another round of chips.

The leaden eyes betrayed no emotion in the waging of another gamble.

But the real test was going to be for Chairman Leroy Jones and whether anyone showed up in late August to the Essex County Democratic Party’s annual fundraiser at Nanina's.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Senate brings years-long battle to a close with passage of Essex County judicial nominations

By Chase Brush | August 18th, 2014

State Sen. Ron Rice (D-28) stands with newly-appointed Essex County judge Bahir Kamil of South Orange

TRENTON - After a four year battle between senate Democrats and the governor’s office over a package of Essex County judicial nominations, the state senate approved the names of eight judges today to serve full terms in the state Superior Court.

Relief was the feeling among lawmakers who worked on the package, moving it along on its journey from the front office to the senate floor.

“I feel good about it, it’s a good day for the people of New Jersey, it’s a good day for the people of Essex County,” state Sen. Nick Scutari (D-2), chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told PolitickerNJ following a hearing this morning in the Statehouse. “It’s going to help relieve some pressures with other judges who are sitting out of county and allow them to go back to their counties.”

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Is Cory Booker in Danger of Getting His Bell Rung by Jeff Bell in November?

Read more
Add your reaction Share

U.S. Senate race: Booker on Bell: "bridge builders," not "right-wing ideologues" needed in D.C. as polls tighten

By Mark Bonamo | August 11th, 2014

 

CAMDEN - With recent polls showing a closer-than-expected battle with Republican U.S. Senate candidate Jeff Bell, incumbent Democrat U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) laced into Bell on Monday, implying that Bell is part of the problem, not the solution, to partisan gridlock in Washington, D.C..

"I told voters in the last election that I was going to go down there not to be a partisan - I was going down there to build bridges so we could actually get things done for the people in state of New Jersey," said Booker, who defeated GOP conservative Steve Lonegan by 11 percentage points in the special U.S. Senate election in October 2013 to replace the late U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg. "In a very short period of time, I've already got legislation moving with a number of Republicans. From working with U.S. Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC) on apprenticeship programs, U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk (R-IL) on expanding resources for public schools to expand their school year and U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), a potential presidential candidate, on expanding access to spectrum [Internet] broadband penetration for disadvantaged folk - this is really the norm. 

"I'm demonstrating to voters that I don't want to be a part of the partisan gridlock," Booker added. "I'm going to break through that."

Read more
Add your reaction Share

← Previous  1  2    140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148    184  185  Next →