Rice on 2017 Democratic gubernatorial bid: “I may run myself”

By Mark Bonamo | 03/03/15

PolitickerNJ

 

NEWARK – State Sen. Ron Rice (D-28) said that he is considering a run for the Democratic nomination in 2017 to be New Jersey governor, citing a need for bold leadership that reflects the interests of New Jersey’s urban communities.

“I may run myself. I may run for governor. I don’t need to win to carry a message,” Rice told PolitickerNJ on Tuesday after speaking at a Newark City Hall news conference outlining the intentions of a city delegation he will lead to Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, seeking to redress problems stemming from the debate about the direction of Newark’s public schools. “I have no problem picking up petitions to run if, in fact, we don’t have a meeting of the minds. One thing they always tell you about running for governor is that it costs a lot of money. Well, I’ve read the state statute, and it costs you 100 signatures on a petition to run. Running does not always mean that you’re going to be victorious at the end, but it gives you the opportunity to be heard on behalf of the people you represent and be critical of the other candidates and hopefully get into debates on substantive issues that they don’t want to discuss.”

The pool of potential Democratic gubernatorial candidates in 2017 has grown over the past several months. Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop, state Senate President Steve Sweeney (D-3), former U.S. Ambassador to Germany Phil Murphy, state Assemblyman John Wisniewski (D-19), state Senator Ray Lesniak (D-20) and former Governor and state Senator Richard Codey (D-27) are all reportedly considering a run at Trenton’s top spot.

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NJ Public Employees Ready to Hit Gov. Christie with New Pension-Funding Suit

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Sweeney, in Newark, talks about Anderson, Christie and Atlantic City

By Mark Bonamo | 02/13/15

PolitickerNJ

 

NEWARK – After touring a preschool in Newark to underscore the importance of early childhood education on Friday, state Senate President Steve Sweeney (D-3) answered questions about a range of issues that affect both New Jersey’s largest city and the state as a whole.

One critical issue that continues to embroil Newark civic life is Newark Schools Superintendent Cami Anderson’s leadership of New Jersey’s largest school district

Christie’s decision to appoint Anderson to head Newark’s public schools in 2011 has created what many see as an educational impasse, especially after Ms. Anderson launched her school reorganization scheme, known as the “One Newark” plan, in September. Meant to improve the city’s public education system by increasing student options, the plan has left many parents angry, confused and frustrated. A widespread community backlash included vociferous student, parental and teacher protests. Prominent local politicians also spoke out, including state Senate education committee chair Teresa Ruiz, who stated that “the trust is gone” in Ms. Anderson’s leadership of the city’s schools. Yet Christie doubled down on his support for Ms. Anderson and her plan, renewing her contract for three more years in June.

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Rutgers-Eagleton Poll: NJ support for ‘abrasive’ Christie hits ‘all-time low’

By Max Pizarro | 02/13/15

PolitickerNJ

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie speaks to guests at the Iowa Freedom Summit on January 24, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa.

 

In Chicago Thursday after staggering through a blunder-filled British tour a week ago, Governor Chris Christie now faces New Jersey voters who have soured on the governor, according to today’s latest Rutgers-Eagleton Poll.

As he maintains a 2016 presidential campaign tour with swings this week to Iowa and Illinois, the Republican governor’s support has collapsed to just 37 percent of registered NJ voters reporting a favorable impression, down seven points in just two months, the poll reports.

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Cory Booker, biggest Democratic recipient of pro-Israel donations, faces pressure on Iran sanctions

By Jonathan D. Salant | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
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on February 10, 2015

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, right, the biggest Democratic recipient of pro-Israel donations during the 2014 congressional elections, is seen here as Newark mayor meeting with Israel's consul general in New York, Ido Aharoni, in 2013.

 

WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Cory Booker received more money from pro-Israel donors than any other Democratic candidate in the last election cycle. Now he faces pressure to join them in supporting increased sanctions on Iran.

Booker so far has resisted entreaties to sign onto legislation introduced by fellow New Jersey Democratic U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez that would impose new sanctions on Iran if negotiations on rolling back its nuclear program do not succeed by a March 24 deadline for establishing a political framework for such a deal.

"I think he should be on it," said Dr. Ben Chouake of Englewood, president of NorPAC, the an influential nonpartisan pro-Israel group that raised or donated more than $150,000 to Booker. "The legislation is good and we have asked him to sign on. I would be delighted to see him sign on."

 

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Jerseyan's place in history sealed as soon as he sat at lunch counter | Di Ionno

By Mark Di Ionno | The Star-Ledger
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on February 11, 2015

On January 31st, in 1961 Charles Taylor, of Scotch Plains, was one of the Friendship Junior College students who sat at a lunch counter at McCrory's lunch counter in Rock Hill, South Carolina and was arrested. Their conviction was recently overturned.

 

Charles Taylor was no ordinary freshman, no naive kid, when he left New Jersey to play football at a small, all-black Baptist college in South Carolina.
He was 22 years old, with a wife and daughter, and four years of factory work under his belt at General Motor's Hyatt Roller Bearing plant in Clark.

"I didn't know nothing about segregation," he said. "I never came in contact with it."
But in Rock Hill, S.C., Taylor would be one of the Friendship College students arrested on trespassing charges for sitting at the lunch counter at the local McCrory's, a five-and-dime that served food.

"Black people made the food, they served the food, but when it came time to eat, you had to go out the back door," Taylor said. "I'd never seen anything like it. Up here, (racism) was more camouflaged. Down there, they came right out with it."

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Debunking Chris Christie’s Claims About Common Core State Standards

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N.J. schools would teach kids how to interact with police under proposed law

By Matt Friedman | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
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on February 10, 2015

TRENTON — New Jersey schools would be required to teach students how they should interact with police officers under proposed legislation a sponsor says could protect both kids and cops.

The bill, (A4130), introduced last week, would require school districts to come up with instructions for students as part of their Social Studies Core Curriculum Content Standards that would include "the role and responsibilities of a law enforcement official in providing for public safety" and "an individual's responsibilities to comply with a directive from a law enforcement official."

One of the sponsors, state Assemblyman Ralph Caputo (D-Essex), said the bill was inspired partly by recent incidents of police shootings around the country, including the death of Michael Brown in Ferugson, Mo.

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Chris Christie’s About-Face on Common Core Standards Turns Debate Upside-Down

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Payne Papers: 13,000 documents from N.J.'s first African American Congressman find home at Seton Hall

By Jessica Mazzola | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
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on February 09, 2015

Congressman Donald Payne speaks during the announcement of a $7 million federal grant for New Jersey fire departments at the Newark Fire Training Academy. April 27, 2011.

 

SOUTH ORANGE — More than 13,000 documents chronicling the political career of New Jersey's first African American Congressman have found a new home.

Seton Hall University announced late last week that its library system has acquired the Donald M. Payne Papers, a historical manuscript from the late Congressman, who represented the state's 10th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1989 until his death in 2012. The collection is made up of more than 13,000 items, including legislative documentation, research files, news clippings, photographs, and AV recordings, the school said in an announcement about the acquisition.

"My father lived a fascinating and fruitful life, dedicated to human rights and conflict resolution. Anyone reviewing the collection will find insight and inspiration, not only through my father's work as a Congressman, but his life-long passion and dedication to making the world a better place," Payne's son, Donald Jr., who currently holds the Congressional seat his father once did, said in a statement about the acquisition.

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