The silent Republican | Opinion

Posted Nov 29, 2020

By Lee Seglem

Lee Seglem, who retired earlier this year as executive director of the New Jersey State Commission of Investigation, asks of those in New Jersey who remained steadfastly speechless and loyal to Trump until very, very recently, I would like an answer to this question: How is it that otherwise intelligent people like you, people who grew up playing by the rules, people who usually recognize the difference between right and wrong, between a lie and the truth — how is it that you so readily and willfully constructed a blind spot around everything Trump?

---

I love my country.

I hate what has happened to it.

So while this is all still fresh in our minds, let’s remember what we’ve been through these last four years — particularly these last few weeks — and vow to never forget.

The United States of America, an anchor of the free world, a beacon of Democracy, was on the verge of being dragged into the shadows like the victim of a mugging, or worse. The incumbent president’s treacherous refusal to respect the will of the voters — indeed, his blatant autocratic attempt to subvert that will — was an attack on our core as a free nation, on our Constitution as the governing soul of our nation and on the rule of law as the ultimate guard rail separating us from an abyss of political chaos.

Read more
1 reaction Share

House Republicans seek to censure top Trump critic Pascrell

Posted Nov 28, 2020

Some of the most conservative Republicans in the U.S. House don’t like Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr.’s attacks on President Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election and moved Friday to censure the New Jersey congressman.

Arizona Rep. Andy Biggs, chair of the far-right House Freedom Caucus, introduced a censure resolution with four of his colleagues, Warren Davidson of Ohio, Andy Harris of Maryland, Debbie Lesko of Arizona and Randy Weber of Texas. Former New Jersey Rep. Scott Garrett was a co-founder of the group.

Pascrell, D-9th Dist., on Saturday called the lawmakers “fascist wannabes.”

Read more
1 reaction Share

Trump’s racist gambit did not work. Consider it a warning | Editorial

Posted Nov 27, 2020

Donald Trump appears closer to accepting that he can no longer go on pretending that he won the election, after three weeks of hearing judges cackle at his fatuous claims.

But let’s not forget how he tried to use racist vote-purging to steal the election, and how members of his party remained mute during this effort to savage our democracy.

Trump’s campaign attempted to throw out millions of ballots that were cast in minority cities such as Detroit, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, and Atlanta. Never during this process did his legal legions produce evidence of widespread fraud or any impropriety in these places, and multiple courts rejected every challenge, usually with gusto.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Mayor Baraka: This COVID-19 lockdown will save lives | Opinion

Posted Nov 27, 2020

By Ras J. Baraka

In the past week, there has been much speculation over Newark’s 10-day lockdown. People seemed to get caught up in the semantics, trying to figure out the words to describe the measure rather than focusing on the intent, which is simply and bluntly to save lives. To save lives.

It is ironic to me that in his holiday season, where we pause to celebrate our blessings and be among those we love, some of us have forgotten COVID-19’s tragic impact on families, who now have someone missing at the table. It is the responsibility of all of us to stop these losses.

Read more
1 reaction Share

N.J. Governor Wants Schools Open. Local Officials Have Other Ideas.

By 

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Nov. 26, 2020

Gov. Philip D. Murphy joined with the governors of six other states to tout in-person instruction. But he has permitted districts to make their own choices.

---

SCOTCH PLAINS, N.J. — Gov. Philip D. Murphy has urged New Jersey school districts to open for some face-to-face instruction, repeatedly noting that the coronavirus spread among teachers and students was far lower than expected.

Last week, as New York City was reeling from the mayor’s decision to close the nation’s largest school district, Mr. Murphy joined with six other governors — including New York’s — to release a public statement about the importance, and relative safety, of in-person instruction.

His own schools weren’t listening: While most districts in New Jersey had reopened for some in-person instruction, many announced plans this week to return to all-remote learning through all or part of the holidays.

The tensions point to the difficulty governors across the Northeast have had in persuading districts to reopen more fully — decisions that often require school boards to buck powerful teachers unions and to live with the inherent risk of outbreaks as the virus surges.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Trump says he’ll leave if Electoral College seats Biden

Posted Nov 26, 2020

By Jill Colvin, Associated Press

NJ.com

President Donald Trump walks out to speak in the Brady Briefing Room in the White House, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020, in Washington, with Vice President Mike Pence. 

---

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Thursday that he will leave the White House if the Electoral College formalizes President-Elect Joe Biden’s victory — even as he insisted such a decision would be a “mistake” — as he spent his Thanksgiving renewing baseless claims that “massive fraud” and crooked officials in battleground states caused his election defeat.

“Certainly I will. But you know that,” Trump said Thursday when asked whether he would vacate the building, allowing a peaceful transition of power in January. But Trump — taking questions for the first time since Election Day — insisted that “a lot of things” would happen between now and then that might alter the results.

“This has a long way to go,” Trump said, even though he lost.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Bruce Boynton, civil rights pioneer who inspired 1961 Freedom Rides, dies at 83

SELMA, Ala. — Bruce Carver Boynton, a civil rights pioneer from Alabama who inspired the landmark “Freedom Rides” of 1961, died Monday. He was 83.

Former Alabama state Sen. Hank Sanders, a friend of Boynton’s, on Tuesday confirmed his passing.

Boynton was arrested 60 years ago for entering the white part of a racially segregated bus station in Virginia and launching a chain reaction that ultimately helped to bring about the abolition of Jim Crow laws in the South. Boynton contested his conviction, and his appeal resulted in a U.S. Supreme Court decision that prohibited bus station segregation and helped inspire the “Freedom Rides.”

Read more
1 reaction Share

N.J.’s largest city begins 10-day ‘shelter in place’ request as coronavirus cases surge

Newark residents were asked to stay home for 10 days citywide, beginning the day before Thanksgiving, in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus in New Jersey’s largest city.

Though not enforced or mandated by executive order, Mayor Ras Baraka strongly encouraged the move due to skyrocketing cases of the virus in Newark.

“We are, from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to Dec. 4, going to lock the city down,” Baraka previously said in a radio appearance on WBGO 88.3FM. “We want people to shelter in place. We only want folks to come out for essential purposes. Do not go outside if you don’t have to. Don’t mingle with other people if you don’t have to. Stay (with) your family in your immediate household.”

Read more
1 reaction Share

Splitting 5 to 4, Supreme Court Backs Religious Challenge to Cuomo’s Virus Shutdown Order

By 

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Nov. 26, 2020

Easter Mass was live-streamed from a mostly empty Catholic church in Brooklyn in April.

---

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court late Wednesday night barred restrictions on religious services in New York that Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo had imposed to combat the coronavirus.

The vote was 5 to 4, with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and the court’s three liberal members in dissent. The order was the first in which the court’s newest member, Justice Amy Coney Barrett, played a decisive role.

The court’s ruling was at odds with earlier ones concerning churches in California and Nevada. In those cases, decided in May and July, the court allowed the states’ governors to restrict attendance at religious services.

The Supreme Court’s membership has changed since then, with Justice Barrett succeeding Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died in September. The vote in the earlier cases was also 5 to 4, but in the opposite direction, with Chief Justice Roberts joining Justice Ginsburg and the other three members of what was then the court’s four-member liberal wing.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Will COVID-19 cancel spring’s statewide student evaluations?

JOHN MOONEY, EDUCATION WRITER | NOVEMBER 26, 2020

NJ Spotlight News

Education commissioner-elect Angelica Allen-McMillan and Gov. Phil Murphy

---

Among the many questions facing New Jersey public schools in this pandemic year: What’s going to happen to statewide student testing?

Hotly debated even in the best of times, the state’s testing program — Student Learning Assessments — was suspended last spring at the height of the first COVID-19 outbreak. Now the state just announced that this fall’s limited administration of the student evaluations has been scratched as well.

But with the vast majority of schools relying on at least some remote learning, questions have surfaced about what will happen this spring in the main testing period, as fears rise that students are regressing academically.

Read more
1 reaction Share

← Previous  1  2    7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15    279  280  Next →